Fundraising Auctioneer - Scott Robertson Auctioneers Blog

Fundraising Auctioneer

Scott Robertson Auctioneers Blog

Archive for April, 2017

The 2017 Celebrity Martini Glass Auction of Naples FL raised another record setting amount of $600,000+! Scott Robertson Auctioneers has been honored to play a role in the fundraising efforts of the CMGA for the past 5 years.

Brenda Melton & Scott Robertson

 

Since its inception in 2010 the event has grown exponentially due to the vision, hard work and perseverance of its Founder, Brenda Melton.
Brenda founded this event to fulfill the mission of making a difference through the power of art.  To do so, she gathered a roster of martini glasses autographed by celebrities or American heroes and then enlisted noted artists to add their designs to the glasses. All while keeping with the personality and accomplishments of their signers.  
Brenda stated “When I brought Scott Robertson Auctioneers in to conduct and consult for the CMGA, I knew it was the right thing to do but it was scary. Previously a professional auctioneer volunteered their time, which was wonderful, but I knew we needed to take the fundraising portion of the event up to a higher level. The year before Scott came in the event raised $90,000, this years event raised $650,000. In the past 5 years we have raised a total of almost $2 million. which is nothing short of amazing.”
This year’s invitation only event took place on March 26, 2017 and is a prime example of how passion and dedication can pay off in a big way for a non-profit organization. Funds raised at this year’s auction will benefit the PAWS Assistance Dogs organization.  PAWS breeds, trains and places support and therapy dogs with children and veterans who have physical, neurological and developmental disabilities.
 

A highlight of the live auction was the martini glass signed by Lin-Manuel Miranda of Hamilton fame.  The glass was beautifully designed and once the bidding reached $20,000 for the glass, generous supporters Jay & Patty Baker stepped up and offered to donate 2 exclusive tickets to a Hamilton show on Broadway.  The tickets increased the value of the package to $40,000 with the Bakers being the winning bidders. At that moment, Patty with a gleam in her eyes announced, “Scott I will donate the tickets to the auction if you sell them right now”. The bidding escalated to $15,000 for the pair of tickets, thus bringing the total value of the package to $55,000.

CMGA is yet another glowing example of how a proven need, motivated chairs, engaged donors, great product when combined with a driving force on stage (Scott Robertson Auctioneers) are a winning combination!

Not All Items Belong in the Live Auction

Posted by Jessica Geer On April 6th

After 20-plus years as a Professional Benefit Auctioneer, I’ve seen charities and organizations make plenty of mistakes when it comes to the Live Auction portion of their fundraising event. Here’s one of the biggest:

Charities or organizations intentionally decide to have items in their live auction which they feel all attendees can afford.

You know the drill – putting three or four items up for bid, in the live auction, that will meet everyone’s price point. By doing this you probably feel better because now everyone can participate in the excitement and have the chance to take something home at the end of the night.

This sure sounds like a great idea. The problem is – come Monday morning – your bottom line will suffer.

You must remember, it takes as much time, effort and energy to auction low priced items as it does more expensive items – and for less money.

Here’s a great example –

You have a trip valued at $3,000 – $5,000 vs. an item in the $20,000 – $25,000 range. Even if the trip would get the top bid of $5,000 – the charity leaves potentially $20,000 on the table. Add that up three to four times during a live auction and you begin to see my point.

(For the record, at your event the “affordable items” may be $300-$500 with the “expensive items” going for $2,000. The percentages are still the same as will be your feelings on Monday morning following the auction.)

So, my recommendation is to put the high priced items in the live auction and place the lower to mid-priced donated items in the silent auction. This is a great way to appease your guests without deep pockets and get them involved.

Another way is to make sure the live auction is lively!  Just because a guest is not a bidder doesn’t mean they can’t have fun cheering on the bidders and watching the action.

 

Time is money.  So invest your Live Auction time wisely.