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Fundraising Auctioneer

Scott Robertson Auctioneers Blog

2016; Another Record Breaking Year

Posted by Jessica Geer On February 24th

Well, another year has come and gone. And I’m happy to report 2016 was another record-breaking year for Scott Robertson Auctioneers.

We hosted 68 fundraising auctions during those 52 weeks.  And as New Years’ Eve turned into New Years’ Day, the combined total of those auctions reached $35,319,700. Our previous record, which was set in 2015, was just under $29,438,000.

When 2012 started, Sara Rose Bytnar and I had set a personal goal to raise $50 million for charities and organizations within four years. In March of last year, we crossed the $100 million mark. That doubled our original goal in just four years and three months. Here are the actual annual totals for the past five years.

2012 – $14,853,100

2013 – $21,757,360

2014 – $28,152,250

2015 – $29,437,980

2016 – $35,319,70

Total:  $129,520,390

 

Although we are proud of every auction we host, we are especially delighted in six auctions. They include:

  1. *$4,600,000 raised at the Sonoma Wine Weekend Auction, in Sonoma CA.
  2. *$3,205,500 raised at the Philbrook Museum of Art Wine Experience in Tulsa.
  3. *$2,800,000 raised during the Southwest Florida Wine and Food Fest in Fort Myers.
  4.  *$2,300,00 raised at the Immokalee Charity Classic in Naples.
  5.  *$2,057,000 raised at the FARA Energy Ball in Tampa.
  6.  *$1,200,000 raised at Magic Under the Mangroves for the Conservancy of Southwest Florida in Naples.

In addition to raising record-setting dollars, 2016 held some other highlights for Sara and I.

To start with, Sara competed in the International Auctioneer Championship, and was named First Runner-Up. In the world of auctioneering this is a huge honor.

I was selected to be on the Education Committee for the National Auctioneers Associations’ Conference & Show which will be held in Columbus, Ohio in July. I’m currently lining up presenters on my favorite subject – and passion – “How to Make the Most of Your Benefit Auction.”

In August, I presented at the Benefit Auctioneers Summit, sponsored by the National Auctioneers Association and held in San Diego, CA. One hundred twenty four of the top fundraising auctioneers in the USA attended this year’s event.  

Speaking of the National Auctioneers Association, at last summer’s Conference & Show, I took a 3-day course on Social Media marketing. The class dealt with Facebook specifically and was very educational. Sara had taken this class previously and convinced me of its importance. We are firm believers that you need to constantly be reinventing yourself by keeping up with the times. And you simply cannot ignore the impact social media has on today’s world. Even the world of Benefit Auctions.

And finally, I was selected to do 3 live webinars on the subject of Time Lines for Benefit Auctions. These webinars are co-hosted and sponsored by Winspire, a company that offers travel and trip experiences for auctions and other charitable events on a consignment basis.

My first webinar was held in December. It dealt with the subject of Silent Auction timelines and more than 650 people, from around the country, registered for it. On Tuesday, January 17, I’ll be discussing the topic of timelines for Live Auctions and on Tuesday, January 31, I’ll be discussing the topic of timelines for Special Appeals aka Fund-a-Need. Each webinar lasts an hour-and-a-half.

For more information regarding the webinars and to register to listen to them once they’re recorded and aired live, go to our website www.thevoe.com.

So, that wraps up 2016. It was a very rewarding and satisfying 365 days. But, a new year is now upon us. We have new challenges to meet. More money to raise. And more children, families, and animals to help.

 

 

One would think that, after helping to raise millions of dollars for charities in the past 9 months, Benefit Auctioneer Scott Robertson would unwind during the summer.  Kick off his shoes. And simply relax at his Fort Myers, Florida home.  

Well, that’s not Scott.  Instead, he’s spending his summer – his time off from his hectic auctioneering world – to guide hundreds of white water rafters down a fast-flowing river in what they often consider an adventure of a lifetime.   

According to Scott, being an auctioneer and being a white water rafting guide, his two passions besides his wife Mary of course, have many similarities.   

Scott’s career as an auctioneer began over 20 years ago.  But his love for the water – and auctions – started much earlier than that at his childhood home about 50 miles outside of Lexington, Kentucky.

“When I was seven years old I built my first wood raft,” recalled Scott.  “Ironically, that’s about the same age when I started attending farm and antique auctions with my parents. I guess it was destiny the two would meet later on in my life.”

Scott’s early adventures on Flat Creek didn’t stop at rafting. While fishing the swift and cold Kentucky stream he also learned about water flow by observing the bobber at the end of his line.

As often as he could he would be found floating on the creek or fishing from its bank, Scott spent just as much time with his dad, a farmer, and his mom, an antique storeowner, attending auctions.  That’s when he began appreciating the concept of the auction and the power of the auctioneer.

It was 34 years ago this summer when Scott first put his rafting skills and water current knowledge to the test when he became a rafting guide for Adventures On The Gorge on the New and Gauley Rivers in Fayetteville, West Virginia.

“Every summer I really enjoy hanging up my tuxedos and colorful auctioneer vests in exchange for a wetsuit and lifejacket,” said Scott. “I guide about 35 trips down the river during the rafting season.  But, that’s far fewer than the number of trips I take for the remaining nine months traveling the country as a professional benefit auctioneer.”

During one of his rafting trips last year Scott realized there were several similarities between his career as an auctioneer and his summer job, of being a white water rafting guide.

“The first thought I had when comparing the two was nervous energy,” said Scott.  “I always have nervous energy prior to an auction and prior to launching the raft.  Regardless of the number of auctions you conduct or trips you take down the river you are only as good as your next trip or performance.”

Another comparison can be stated in four words:  Living in the moment.

“It’s impossible to have anything else on your mind but the mission ahead when you are entering into a rapid or conducting an auction.  You must have total focus,” he said.  “And you must think two to three moves ahead – planning where you need to be and what you need to do to get there.”

Then there’s analyzing the audience.  According to Scott, an auctioneer must be able to size up the attendees at a fundraising auction to maximize the charity’s profit. The same holds true for those eight individuals boarding the white water raft.  The guide must be able to size up each passenger and play to their strengths to minimize their weaknesses.

The final two comparisons are Scott’s favorites.

“Everyone depends on my leadership role whether times are good or challenging.  As a benefit auctioneer you must control the action from start to finish. The organizers and attendees of the event depend me to take charge of the auction and see it through to a successful completion.

The same is true when I’m a white water rafting guide.  There is a trust factor and those on the raft must have total confidence that I’m going to get them down the river safely.”

Scott added, “Perhaps my favorite comparison deals with having fun.  Guests at a fundraiser want to have a good time and be entertained in the process.  The passengers on my raft want the same thing – to have fun.  There’s no better sensation than the “feeling of satisfaction” trip after trip or auction after auction.”  

Scott, who turned 56 a few months back, said he has no immediate plans to hang up his wetsuit any time soon.  In fact, he and his wife Mary, who he met while being a guide and is a guide herself, purchased 6 acres about four miles from the rafting company and relocated a 200-year old cabin on the site.

“This is my home away from home,” stated Scott.  “I still love white water rafting as much today as I did when I first arrived 34 years ago.” 

“It’s the same with auctioneering.  I think it’s even more fun now. I simply love the interaction with people, especially the event chairs when their fundraising goals weren’t just met – but exceeded.”

Scott concluded, “I have to admit, if I’m being honest, I truly love what I do.  Whether it’s being a guide on a white water rafting adventure or being the auctioneer for an important fundraising event – I love to lead.  You might say regarding both disciplines, I’m ‘SOLD!’”

 

 

What do NFL Kickers and Auctioneers have in Common?

Posted by Scott On February 5th

When the Game’s on the line – hire the best.

On the rare occasion I have a Sunday off I, like many people across the country, enjoy watching NFL football.  Ironically, one of the last games I watched I had an epiphany regarding the field goal kicker. I realized we had something in common.

The scenario was pretty straight forward.  If he made the kick his team would win the game.  If he missed – they would lose.                                                                                                        .football

If you think about it, in a game played within the regulation 60 minutes, the kicker may only be on the field for a maximum of 20 seconds actual game time.  That includes a few field goal attempts and points after touchdown. But those few seconds can be turning point on whether or not his team wins their division, makes the playoffs or takes home the Super Bowl trophy. (The New England Patriots are sitting home this weekend due to a missed extra point)

Team owners and other team officials understand the importance of hiring the best kickers. In fact, the Top 20 field goal kickers in the NFL make $1 million or more annually.  Some are paid as much as $4 million. They are that valuable to the team effort.

One must also realize it takes thousands upon thousands of man hours to get a team ready for play. Even if you just start at the team’s first practice and end when regular season ends, the time and effort put into succeeding is enormous. Yet with all that, it could all come down to one player – on the field – for a short period of time.

It doesn’t surprise me that these top field goal kickers – considering the pressure they are under to produce – can make a good living.

field goal As a professional fundraising auctioneer I often feel like a field goal kicker.

 A great number of people have worked many, many hours to plan an event and then I, like a kicker  with just seconds left in the game for the win, arrive at the event – take the stage – and do what I’ve  learned to do successfully – help charities reach or succeed their  fundraising goals.

Sure it’s a lot of pressure. But when you’re part of the planning process and are totally prepared to do  what you were hired to do – you can approach the task at hand with confidence. The best professional kickers will make the kick. The best professional auctioneer will raise the dough.

I don’t get paid by the hour. Nor does the kicker. We make a good living because of our performance – not by the number of minutes we’re on the field or on the stage.

So when the (fundraising) game is on the line, put me in coach,  and I will put your gala through tfootball coachhe uprights of success.

How I differ from other Charity Auctioneers

Posted by Scott On October 1st

People often ask “So Scott, what makes you different from your competition?”

And really the answer is two-fold. First, there’s my performance the evening of the event (or the day of the event)…whenever it happens to be. So it’s my performance on stage.

But the second, and possibly the most important, is the consulting that I’m able to do with your organization prior to the event.

See, fundraising auctions are all that I do. I eat, sleep, and breathe them all day, EVERY DAY. This is not a side line for me. This is not a secondary type of thing. This is what I do.

When you call, I answer the phone. When you send an email, I respond. And that makes a huge difference in your fundraising success.

You know, there’s lots of tips and tricks and nuances that go on with fundraising auctions and I stay right on top of those trends.

So when you retain my services, not only do you get Scott Robertson the performance auctioneer, you also get Scott Robertson, the fundraising auction consultant.

Not all charity auctioneers are made the same. Some…

Continue reading “How I differ from other Charity Auctioneers” »

You know it seems like 50% of the time when I’m doing an event for the first time, the same question always comes up, right in the heart of the event.

When the silent auction is going on and it’s about to be closed down, someone will come rushing up and say, “Wait, wait! We can’t close the silent auction. We don’t have enough bids!”

Well I’m telling you, ladies and gentlemen, if you don’t follow your timeline, if you don’t close on the timeline…BIG, BIG MISTAKE.

Continue reading “Why You Should Never Delay the Silent Auction at Your Fundraiser” »

Why the Tuxedo at Every Auction Scott?

Posted by Scott On September 4th

Hi, Scott Robertson here and yes, I’m dressed in a tuxedo. I wear a tuxedo every day!

No, just kidding! But I do wear a tuxedo at almost every fundraising event. Why? Because I want people to know who’s in charge when the auction gets started.

See, that’s real important to establish a presence at an event. Not in a dictator manner. But rather just so that people have confidence and understand who’s in charge, who’s leading the event. That’s who you want leading your event is a true leader. And the tuxedo makes me stand out a little more, my voice takes over from there, and everybody wins. We’re all looking for leadership. At a fundraising auction, I consider that my job.

Need America’s leading charity auctioneer to take charge of your fundraiser? Call me at (239) 246-2139 and let’s chat!

-Scott

FB like button

Social Media has revolutionized how we communicate with friends, family, and brands. For decades, the most coveted form of advertising has been word-of-mouth, and now, social media has created a platform where everyone can take part in the conversation. For example, the “Like” button on Facebook has changed how we share information. Every time we “Like” a comment, post, photo, video, or company/organization page, that information is used and perceived in a few ways. If you’re a non-profit, and you can leverage that information, you will be well on your way to being relevant to the next generation of donors.

Facebook is watching your every move.

When you “Like” anything on Facebook, in essence, you are creating your own buyer profile for marketers to target you. “Like” your favorite restaurant or department store page. You will see similar ads show up in your newsfeed for products related to those pages. Do you ever notice when you visit Nordstrom’s website, eyeing a pair of shoes, they magically show up in your newsfeed? It’s powerful stuff! Now, think how you might be able to leverage these tools to reach potential donors and start creating a brand.

Everyone is a spokesmen when using social media, and it has changed how we make purchases.

Continue reading “Social Media for Non-Profits: Building a Culture of Giving One “Like” at a Time” »

Say No to Status Quo

Posted by Scott On August 7th

Today we’re gonna talk about “saying NO to status quo.”

You know, fundraising events need to be fun and they need to be fresh. And they need to be tweaked every year to make them fun and fresh and exciting for your guests to attend. You know 93% of people who attended fundraising events surveyed replied that the reason they attend is because of fun. And fun generally translates into “fun and fresh” which means saying no to status quo.

You know, fundraising events trend. And fundraising ideas trend. Where do you get these new ideas?

Continue reading “Say No to Status Quo” »

Today we’re gonna talk about the differences between a commercial auctioneer and a fundraising auctioneer. One of the main differences is the auction chant. See, a commercial auctioneer is selling product and a fundraising auctioneer is really selling to people. There’s a distinct difference.

At commercial auctions, people are generally auction savvy. They attend auctions on a regular basis and that commercial auctioneer is able to go much faster. In fact when I was selling at a commercial auction, I would generally sell 80 to 100 items an hour. That’s fast! At a fundraising auction, the rate is generally around 20 items per hour. Let me give you a difference in the chant. At a commercial auction it would sound more like:

(spoken in a rapid cadence)

“Two thousand dollars is bid, now three thousand, three thousand and four. Four now five. Five now six and seven thousand. Seven thousand now eight. Eight thousand? Sold! Seven thousand dollars!”

And at a fundraising auction it would go more along the line of…

Continue reading “Difference between commercial & fundraising auctioneers” »

Hi Scott Robertson here. Today we’re going to talk about momentum at your fundraising auction.

When you start the live auction you need to start with momentum and keep that momentum rolling all the way through to the conclusion of the live auction. Don’t interrupt it with pulling raffle tickets, speeches, or anything!

Keep the momentum rolling!

There is one exception to the rule and that is perhaps in the middle or at the end you can do what we call Fund a Need that’s okay as long as it fits in to the flow of the entire event. But once the live auction gets started, maintain that momentum and that will allow you to have success.

Do not interrupt the momentum. You’ll be disappointed if you do. Listen to your professional fundraising auctioneer. They’ll be singing the same song that I’m singing which is keep the momentum rolling.

If you’d like a consultation with a professional who can help you exceed your fundraising goals, I’d love to help. Please contact me to set up a meeting.