Fundraising Auctioneer - Scott Robertson Auctioneers Blog

Fundraising Auctioneer

Scott Robertson Auctioneers Blog

Why the Tuxedo at Every Auction Scott?

Posted by Scott On September 4th

Hi, Scott Robertson here and yes, I’m dressed in a tuxedo. I wear a tuxedo every day!

No, just kidding! But I do wear a tuxedo at almost every fundraising event. Why? Because I want people to know who’s in charge when the auction gets started.

See, that’s real important to establish a presence at an event. Not in a dictator manner. But rather just so that people have confidence and understand who’s in charge, who’s leading the event. That’s who you want leading your event is a true leader. And the tuxedo makes me stand out a little more, my voice takes over from there, and everybody wins. We’re all looking for leadership. At a fundraising auction, I consider that my job.

Need America’s leading charity auctioneer to take charge of your fundraiser? Call me at (239) 246-2139 and let’s chat!

-Scott

FB like button

Social Media has revolutionized how we communicate with friends, family, and brands. For decades, the most coveted form of advertising has been word-of-mouth, and now, social media has created a platform where everyone can take part in the conversation. For example, the “Like” button on Facebook has changed how we share information. Every time we “Like” a comment, post, photo, video, or company/organization page, that information is used and perceived in a few ways. If you’re a non-profit, and you can leverage that information, you will be well on your way to being relevant to the next generation of donors.

Facebook is watching your every move.

When you “Like” anything on Facebook, in essence, you are creating your own buyer profile for marketers to target you. “Like” your favorite restaurant or department store page. You will see similar ads show up in your newsfeed for products related to those pages. Do you ever notice when you visit Nordstrom’s website, eyeing a pair of shoes, they magically show up in your newsfeed? It’s powerful stuff! Now, think how you might be able to leverage these tools to reach potential donors and start creating a brand.

Everyone is a spokesmen when using social media, and it has changed how we make purchases.

Continue reading “Social Media for Non-Profits: Building a Culture of Giving One “Like” at a Time” »

Say No to Status Quo

Posted by Scott On August 7th

Today we’re gonna talk about “saying NO to status quo.”

You know, fundraising events need to be fun and they need to be fresh. And they need to be tweaked every year to make them fun and fresh and exciting for your guests to attend. You know 93% of people who attended fundraising events surveyed replied that the reason they attend is because of fun. And fun generally translates into “fun and fresh” which means saying no to status quo.

You know, fundraising events trend. And fundraising ideas trend. Where do you get these new ideas?

Continue reading “Say No to Status Quo” »

Today we’re gonna talk about the differences between a commercial auctioneer and a fundraising auctioneer. One of the main differences is the auction chant. See, a commercial auctioneer is selling product and a fundraising auctioneer is really selling to people. There’s a distinct difference.

At commercial auctions, people are generally auction savvy. They attend auctions on a regular basis and that commercial auctioneer is able to go much faster. In fact when I was selling at a commercial auction, I would generally sell 80 to 100 items an hour. That’s fast! At a fundraising auction, the rate is generally around 20 items per hour. Let me give you a difference in the chant. At a commercial auction it would sound more like:

(spoken in a rapid cadence)

“Two thousand dollars is bid, now three thousand, three thousand and four. Four now five. Five now six and seven thousand. Seven thousand now eight. Eight thousand? Sold! Seven thousand dollars!”

And at a fundraising auction it would go more along the line of…

Continue reading “Difference between commercial & fundraising auctioneers” »

Hi Scott Robertson here. Today we’re going to talk about momentum at your fundraising auction.

When you start the live auction you need to start with momentum and keep that momentum rolling all the way through to the conclusion of the live auction. Don’t interrupt it with pulling raffle tickets, speeches, or anything!

Keep the momentum rolling!

There is one exception to the rule and that is perhaps in the middle or at the end you can do what we call Fund a Need that’s okay as long as it fits in to the flow of the entire event. But once the live auction gets started, maintain that momentum and that will allow you to have success.

Do not interrupt the momentum. You’ll be disappointed if you do. Listen to your professional fundraising auctioneer. They’ll be singing the same song that I’m singing which is keep the momentum rolling.

If you’d like a consultation with a professional who can help you exceed your fundraising goals, I’d love to help. Please contact me to set up a meeting.

You know I’ve enjoyed a lot of success in the fundraising auction business and I LOVE setting new records for events. It’s absolutely wonderful. And people often ask “So Scott, how can your percentages of establishing new records be so high?’ Well, it’s about confidence…and really, confidence in three areas.

  1. Confidence in the economy
  2. Confidence in the charity
  3. Confidence in your fundraising auctioneer

Continue reading “To set record highs at fundraisers, confidence is paramount” »

What’s Up With the Crazy Vests, Scott?

Posted by Scott On June 15th

You know, I’m often asked “Scott, what is up with those crazy vests?” Well, they’re sort of my trademark…is to wear a colorful vest at fundraising auctions. It started back in the 90s when vests replaced cumberbunds and a friend of mine Debbie, from Black Tie Tuxedo in Fort Myers, Florida said “You know Scott, what you should do is you should get a vest that makes you stand out” and she pointed to this exact vest.

And I said “Oh Debbie, I’m way to conservative for that.” And she says “No, you want it! It’ll make you stand out!” And I thought “You know, that’s exactly what I’m looking for.”

So I purchased this vest and since now, I’ve probably purchased 40 vests. So I try to match my vest to the color scheme of the event, the motif of the event…whatever they want. So if you retain my services for a fundraising auction, tell me what colors you want me to match. Chances are I’ve got a vest that’ll do the trick. Crazy vests? I LOVE ’em!

Quality Sound is an absolute key component to any and all fundraising events. People have to be able to hear to understand. But I’m going to take that a step further and I’m going to tell you that a sound check with your audio director prior to the event is absolutely critical to success.

Who is going to be there for the sound check?

Obviously the auctioneer needs to be there for the sound check because it’s going to be their voice who’s going to be heard throughout the evening. But who else should be there for the sound check is anyone who is going to speak. If you have anyone giving a presentation, anyone giving an award, they need to be comfortable with the microphone and the sound engineer needs to understand the nuances of the person’s speaking voice so that they can adjust accordingly.

People often say “It’s okay, I’m just gonna get up there and wing it!”

Continue reading “A Sound Check is Critical to Your Fundraising Event’s Success” »

Avoidable Train Wrecks at Fundraising Auctions

Posted by Scott On April 17th

I truly love what I do. 

However sometimes my passion at a fundraising event is misinterpreted causing those who’ve hired me to feel as if I’m personally attacking their organization – or a person within their organization.

Scott Robertson AuctioneerThe reason for these hard feelings?  I can see a train wreck coming and I just told the organizers:

  • What type of train it is
  • How fast it’s approaching
  • And when it will hit.

The approaching train wreck comes in many forms.  It could be a gaffe in the timeline or a problem with the speaker about to address the audience.  It could be a Live Auction item, a display issue or even a potential bottleneck due to the layout of the room.

There are so many variables at an auction.

If those variables are done correctly it will enhance the event and there won’t be a train wreck.  If those variables are implemented incorrectly it will hurt the event and create a potential train wreck situation.

Knowing the difference between the two scenarios is the reason for my dilemma. The question is: Do the event organizers want to know a train wreck is coming or not?

When it comes to approaching train wrecks I work with two different mindsets.

Continue reading “Avoidable Train Wrecks at Fundraising Auctions” »

to helm and back - Scott Robertson AuctioneersI’ve always said a successful fundraising event is a team effort. It takes months of pre-planning and an excellent committee and volunteer staff to pull all the pieces together.  Having each individual member know the exact role they will be playing during the event is crucial to its flawless execution.

The Event Chair and his or her committee and volunteers have an advantage over a Professional Auctioneer, such as myself, who does not live in their particular city. They know the key players and the main donors that will be attending.

Since I am the out-of-towner, some Event Chairs and Board Members may consider it a disadvantage to their fundraising efforts if they hire me as their Professional Auctioneer since, in some cases, I’ve never practiced my craft of auctioneering for them before.  They feel I won’t know their audience.

Although it’s an initial legitimate concern, the fact is the “not knowing their VIPs” can be easily overcome.  It’s just a matter of four easy steps:

  1. Create an attendee yearbook
  2. Facilitate some warm introductions
  3. Generate a roster of bidders
  4. Produce informative bidding paddles

Let me start with the first…the yearbook.

Continue reading “How to Help Your Auctioneer Learn Your Audience” »