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Archive for the ‘Donors’ Category

Raffles at a Virtual Fundraising Gala?

Posted by Jessica Geer On September 25th

Raffles at Virtual Fundraising Galas can be a good idea.

Surprised?  Many of you with whom I’ve worked in the past are probably thinking  “Scott hates raffles, there’s no way he’s going to want it to apply to a Virtual Fundraising Gala.”

However; I stick to my previous statement; raffles at Virtual Fundraising Galas can be a good idea.

Here’s why. The primary reason I dislike raffles at fundraising events is the method of raffle ticket sales. Typically, once you arrive at a fundraising event and get through registration, the first person that you see is someone coming up attempting to sell you a raffle ticket. They ambush your supporters before they can even get their first cocktail.

At this point your chances of offending someone are great; which sets the wrong tone for the evening. The additional downside is by donating a little bit of money for a raffle ticket, there’s a chance the supporter will feel like they have done “their part” in supporting the charity. Think bigger picture.

What happens with raffle ticket sales at a virtual event and why is it different?

Well, first of all, unless they are a late registrant, you’re not going to ask people the night of the event to buy raffle tickets. The supporters are going to be offered the opportunity during online registration.

Chances are registration for a virtual gala is going to happen a week or even two weeks before the event. Then when it becomes the night of the event they remember they bought a raffle ticket but they’re really not feeling the pain of buying the raffle ticket and no one ever made them uncomfortable.

That’s found money for the charity.

Then during the course of the live event we activate the digital wheel of chance.  This wheel will contain all the names of ticket buyers and be displayed on a big LCD panel behind the auctioneer.  We build the excitement, spin the digital wheel, then we have a winner and celebrate.

It’s no fuss and it’s done rather efficiently and quickly. If you were to give out multiple raffle prizes, it’s really easy to remove a name from the wheel, (it can be done in less than a second) and we spin the wheel again

Instead of it being a long drawn out process it’s quick, it’s immediate, it’s fun.  People will be eager to their names on the wheel as it’s spinning, which is a wonderful thing.

This generates excitement and engagement for the audience!

When we get back to traditional galas, am I still going to love raffles? The answer is likely no, for the reasons that were stated above. But for virtual fundraising galas, I say “go for it” as another stream of income for your charitable event

Ready to learn more about how a Virtual Fundraising Gala can help your organization raise funds?  Contact us today!

 

When is the Best Night for a Virtual Gala?

Posted by Jessica Geer On September 22nd

For years, I’ve been promoting the idea of having your fundraising event during the week as opposed to a Friday or Saturday night because of the reduction of competition from other fundraising events and social gatherings.

Well, with virtual, that has only gotten larger.

In today’s COVID world, none of us have very much happening socially… we just don’t have very much going on at all. However, if we do have something occurring, such as a family visit, dinner with friends, or other small gatherings, or even football games, it’s probably going to be on a Friday or Saturday night, thus, competition.

If you have your virtual gala during the week, chances are you’re going to be holding it early enough in the evening that people can enjoy the virtual gala, eat dinner, and go to bed at a respectable time.

As attendees are not going to be out till 10 o’clock and then have to go to work the next day or whatever their schedule has them doing. (Retired people have busy schedules too.) Thus, what we’re finding is that Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday are actually producing better results than Friday and Saturday, and it’s all because of competition. This trend is happening nationwide.

So, if you want to eliminate the competition, pick a night when little else is occurring. Your virtual gala will be the best show in town.

The Day After an Event is No Time to Relax

Posted by Jessica Geer On March 7th

You just hosted a great event the previous evening. You feel really good. The event exceeded expectations for fundraising. Everything went smoothly. You’re feeling very proud of yourself and your team. And you should feel proud. Congratulations. That was a job well done.

However, if you’re thinking; “Now that that’s behind me I can take the day off to get some rest. I’ll deal with all those small details that we need to take care of in the next week or two. I deserve a little break.” Think again!

The day after the event there are two very important things that need to be done.

One is to write down everything that went well and everything that was challenging or needs improvement. This information will be revealed during the debriefing meeting that will be held in the near future and executed during next year’s event.

The second thing, and perhaps even more important, is to get on the phone and call the generous people who donated to your cause – who made the event so successful – and to say thank you.

It doesn’t have to be a long phone call. It doesn’t have to be from the CEO. It can be from volunteers. It can be from board members. It can be from almost anyone. Just call.

Remember, a timely phone call placed the day after the event is not interfering in your attendees’ lives – it’s going to make them feel very grateful for attending and giving. Pre-write the script and keep your thank you short. Have just a few talking points and remind them where the money is going. But most of all, just extend your gratitude.

We all know that everyone is busy and not always at home or in their office. This could mean your call will be forwarded to voicemail. That brings up the question; “Should I leave a message of thanks, or call the donor back at a later time and talk to him or her in person?” Now this answer may surprise you – Leave the Message.

Voicemails work even better to your favor because you’re going to be able to say what you wish to say and extend your gratitude, and it’s going to take less time. Leaving a voicemail is just as good as speaking with the person on the phone. Don’t be afraid to do it.

The important thing to remember is to extend your gratitude to the donors immediately the next day – while they still have the euphoria for giving. Two weeks down the road, your event will be a past memory.

And don’t ask them for their support next year, just stay in the present. Extend your gratitude for this year. If you do that, you and your charity will be viewed as people who truly care and are truly grateful.

So, write that short script. Then burn up the phone lines. If they’re not home, leave a message. It will pay off in dividends for years to come. And, hey, it’s the right thing to do.