Fundraising Auctioneer - Scott Robertson Auctioneers Blog

Fundraising Auctioneer

Scott Robertson Auctioneers Blog

Raffles at a Virtual Fundraising Gala?

Posted by Jessica Geer On September 25th

Raffles at Virtual Fundraising Galas can be a good idea.

Surprised?  Many of you with whom I’ve worked in the past are probably thinking  “Scott hates raffles, there’s no way he’s going to want it to apply to a Virtual Fundraising Gala.”

However; I stick to my previous statement; raffles at Virtual Fundraising Galas can be a good idea.

Here’s why. The primary reason I dislike raffles at fundraising events is the method of raffle ticket sales. Typically, once you arrive at a fundraising event and get through registration, the first person that you see is someone coming up attempting to sell you a raffle ticket. They ambush your supporters before they can even get their first cocktail.

At this point your chances of offending someone are great; which sets the wrong tone for the evening. The additional downside is by donating a little bit of money for a raffle ticket, there’s a chance the supporter will feel like they have done “their part” in supporting the charity. Think bigger picture.

What happens with raffle ticket sales at a virtual event and why is it different?

Well, first of all, unless they are a late registrant, you’re not going to ask people the night of the event to buy raffle tickets. The supporters are going to be offered the opportunity during online registration.

Chances are registration for a virtual gala is going to happen a week or even two weeks before the event. Then when it becomes the night of the event they remember they bought a raffle ticket but they’re really not feeling the pain of buying the raffle ticket and no one ever made them uncomfortable.

That’s found money for the charity.

Then during the course of the live event we activate the digital wheel of chance.  This wheel will contain all the names of ticket buyers and be displayed on a big LCD panel behind the auctioneer.  We build the excitement, spin the digital wheel, then we have a winner and celebrate.

It’s no fuss and it’s done rather efficiently and quickly. If you were to give out multiple raffle prizes, it’s really easy to remove a name from the wheel, (it can be done in less than a second) and we spin the wheel again

Instead of it being a long drawn out process it’s quick, it’s immediate, it’s fun.  People will be eager to their names on the wheel as it’s spinning, which is a wonderful thing.

This generates excitement and engagement for the audience!

When we get back to traditional galas, am I still going to love raffles? The answer is likely no, for the reasons that were stated above. But for virtual fundraising galas, I say “go for it” as another stream of income for your charitable event

Ready to learn more about how a Virtual Fundraising Gala can help your organization raise funds?  Contact us today!

 

I Love my Homework-No really, I do!

Posted by Scott On July 17th

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I love my current occupation as a professional benefit auctioneer. But like many hard working professionals, I often reflect back to my previous occupation and think to myself, “If it wasn’t for the lessons I’ve learned during that job I would not be as successful in my current job.”

What’s ironic about that statement is my previous profession was that of a teacher – and a coach. For 16 years I taught high school – and yes – I assigned plenty of homework.  But I did it with a smile on my face and with passion in my soul knowing that a little hard work on the students part would make them more productive citizens once they tossed their graduation caps into the air and continued life’s wonderful journey away from these hallowed halls.

And during those 16 years I took an old teacher’s adage to heart, “No one cares how much you know until they know how much you care!”  There must be something to those 14 words.  I was fortunate enough to win many awards recognizing me as an outstanding teacher.

Today, most of us shutter at the thought of homework.  I would bet many of you have nightmares on occasion about a homework assignment you didn’t complete – or lost on your way to school.

As for me, I love it. And I have homework assignments every day – every week of the year.

That’s because, as a fundraising auctioneer, I really get involved with the charity or organization I am going to represent.  After all, how can I stand in front of – or in many cases intermingle closely with their guests and donors – if I know very little about the charity and its cause?

So now I have a new adage.  “No one knows how much you care until they know how much you know about their good work.”

To me, homework is everything. It’s the foundation of what I do. In fact, I really don’t care for the word “work” in homework.  I find it enjoyable and rewarding.  And it is a critical component to not only my success – but to the charity’s success as well.

Ahh Homework!  I think I’ll get back at it right after I put the period at the end of this sentence.

 

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One of the first blogs I posted on my website had to do with the subject of saying “thank you.” The focus of that blog was when to send a follow-up thank you to your event’s VIPs and largest, most generous contributors.

If you will recall, the answer was within days. Any thank you that arrives after that time frame seems like water under the bridge since too much time would have elapsed and memories of the event begin to fade.

In this blog I want to discuss saying thank you during an event.

Although every guest should receive a warm welcome and feel as if their presence is very much appreciated – the verbalization of a thank you carries a much heavier weight and is much more appreciated by your guests when it is spoken immediately after the fundraising portion of the event.

Avoid saying “thank you” at the beginning of an event.  And avoid saying “thank you” during the middle of an event.  Overdoing those two words early on is like adding water to soup – it dilutes the power the words and those words will have less meaning when they’ll really mean the most.

“Instant Purchase” Option Gaining Popularity At Silent Auctions

My philosophy is:  “Welcome – and away we go with the auction.”  Nationally this is a fairly new trend – and it has proven to work.  So, save the “thank you’s” for the end when you are actually saying “thanks” for everyone’s generosity.

And don’t forget – a nice thank you goes great with a strong, sincere handshake or a warm hug – when appropriate. It’s not only the perfect combination to end the night – or day – but it will help build the foundation for the guest list for your next year’s event.

Now that I’m done with this blog – may I just say “thank you” for reading it.